What Was I Saying?

A couple of days ago, the story about the electric fence dangers and handy tips, was not what I had planned to write. Somehow, the story took a direction of its own and you heard all about the all the ups and downs of using electric fencing. Then we had the first snowfall of the season and the story for the next day revolved about all that entails, now I think it is time to get back to the original story that I had planned to write…

It begins with the small, solar powered electric fence unit attached to the barn across the river. Since it is on the other side from our power grid, there are no electric services on that side of the river, that is why we use solar power to heat up the fences where they are needed. Anyway, this one unit charges the fences in this area. Continue reading

Predictions From The Predictors

This site is nearly out of data space and it can no longer support the pictures to go with the stories. To see the whole website go to SchmidlinAngusFarms.com where you can see all the important stuff! While there, please shop the affiliate by clicking on the picture link. By using my site to shop, I get credit for directing customers to their site and may make a small commission without a cost to you! Thank you for supporting our farm stories

The weather forecasts are not always reliable, but we still watch them with eager anticipation or dread depending on what is being said. Over the last week, predictions about the coldest Thanksgiving in the last ten years and a chance of snow in the valley including Portland had everyone watching for the latest updates. Here on the farm we went into overdrive trying to get ahead of the upcoming possibility of bad weather. Continue reading

Good And Bad Ways

There are good ways and bad ways to test the zapping strength of an electric fence. Many of the bad ways are found out the hard way by trial and error or by slipping as you are stepping over the said fence.

I vividly remember using a shovel handle to hold the wire down while stepping over a fence, the wooden handle doesn’t conduct electricity and all should have been good. Except for the wire slipping down to the metal cuff near the blade that was touching the ground and I got the full shock of the fence several times before the realization of my error. Continue reading

Our Own Seedling Nursery

In the forest, we transplant as many of our own native grown seedlings as we can. We have always had ok survival rates and are proud that we use our own seedlings that we thinned out of overpopulated areas of the forest to move them to areas that needed planting. But that process is very slow and the digging can injury the other seedlings growing close by. The growing process dramatically slows for the first couple of years since the trees are not used to yearly transplanting and moving like the nursery stock. The seedlings are willowy and tender compared to the nursery stock during those settling years and they are easily damaged. Continue reading

Last Trip Around the Far, Far Field

The next batch of calves to be weaned now have their green weaner clips installed and are comfortably roaming the fields with their mothers while the milk supply dries up. After installing the clips, we moved the herd into the far, far field where they can meander the large pasture, under the fir trees that have grown up along the old railroad grade and the forest around the pasture. The weaning calves will stay in the same field as their mothers for about five days before we haul the calves to the show barn where they will learn to be completely independent from their mothers. Continue reading

A Race With The Weather

This website is nearly out of data and unable to support the addition of photos. To see the whole story with pictures, please visit SchmidlinAngusFarms.com and be sure to do your affiliate shopping by clicking on the Amazon icon. By clicking from my site I get credit for sending people to their site. You do not have to purchase any item that I promote. Prime and special codes work with the icon. I may make a small commission without any cost to you! Thank you for supporting my stories of the farm

I may have bitten off more than I can chew. This last trip to the nursery for the riparian seedlings tempted me to get a full pickup load of plants since the last batch had went into the ground so quickly. Continue reading

Waiting At Home Base

I have talked about the Gator being ‘home base’ for the two dogs that go with us during our daily farm chores, out into the woods, during the firewood project, when bundling in the barns and when working in the riparian. Both Jackson and Butler are eager to get into their regular positions with Butler riding on the front while Jackson prefers the back.

We can have chains, cables, sledge hammer with wedges, baling twine and various tools cluttering up the front yet Butler will still find a way to sneak into the conglomeration as he waits for his driver. Jackson doesn’t care if the bed is loaded with a stack of hay bales four high, chunks of firewood, buckets full of tools for repairing equipment, chainsaws or a baby calf, he finds a way to ride and really enjoys it when he is on top of however many bales of hay we have stacked. He prefers to doze while he waits, many times it looks very uncomfortable to be stretched out over bumpy chunks or resting on a chainsaw motor but that is how he rolls.

On this day we happened to have the front of the Gator fairly cleaned out so Butler had a good spot to wait. The bed had a tied, half-bale of hay that we were going to go feed. While Butler waited patiently with his chin resting on the bench seat, Jackson broke the string on the bale and snuffled around until he got a comfortable nest to rest in for the duration. Both dogs would have been happy to stay at home base for hours but we headed out to work shortly after the pictures were taken.

This site is nearly out of data space and it can no longer support the pictures to go with the stories. To see the whole website go to SchmidlinAngusFarms.com where you can see all the important stuff! Please shop the affiliate by clicking on the picture link, by using my site to shop I get credit for directing customers to their site and may make a small commission without a cost to you! Thank you for supporting our farm stories