Balli and Volcano

Finally, our last calf for this season has been born.

Black Angus Cow/calf pair.We first noticed the long legs of this newborn calf. Volcano weighed in at 88 lbs. born June 2, 2017.

His mother, #195 Bali had been showing signs of calving for the last couple of weeks and we expected her to calve any day. She was struggling with the weight of this calf and started limping about 10 days ago.

Now that Volcano is out into the world, Bali’s limping is easing with each day.

We found the pair close to the river where she calved. Mother and baby black angus crossing river.Within a few hours of birth, Bali led her baby through the river to join the rest of the herd. Volcano stayed right by Bali’s side as the water got deeper. The current held the baby fast to her soft side as he struggled for solid footing. By the time the water was deep enough to worry him, it started to get shallower signaling that they had made it safely to the other side.

 

Pearl and Skitter

A black angus cow with newborn calf hidden in grove of alder trees.#92 Pearl had her brand new calf well hidden in the understory of brush under the alder trees.

We knew she had a calf but we did not know where. As I walked through the brush, a newborn calf was startled. The little one jumped up and started running away. Pearl was busy eating hay that we had scattered out for the herd. With all the chewing, she missed it when her calf jumped up and ran away from the herd and her safety of the tall brush.

We spent nearly a half hour looking for the wayward calf and realized that the baby must have tired and laid back down to nap and we could not find it. We had to rely on Pearl to finish eating first and then start bellowing to call the calf back to her. Which is just what she did.

The next feeding we found Pearl and her baby tucked once again under the big alder trees together. At this time we found out that on 5/4/17 Pearl had a heifer about 65 lbs. We decided to name her after her first adventure, welcome to the farm Skitter.

Sapphire and Violet

Black Angus Cow eating grass inside wooden fence.Mike noticed it first when we were getting ready to do the morning chores, Sapphire was acting unusual. She was hanging away from the main herd, had her tail raised a bit, and kept sniffing the ground. All tell-tail signs that she was in labor.

The day had turned blustery during feeding so we moved Sapphire away from the main group and put her into the barnyard. She acted ravenous, and could not stop eating grass even though it was obvious that she was in the first stages of labor. (It was breakfast time, and she was hungry).

We opened up the barn for her to go inside out of the rain if she wanted and fluffed up several armloads of hay into the manger inside. About an hour later she moved under cover and ate her fill of the sweet hay while continuing with contractions.

By mid-day she had delivered Violet, a 78 lb. heifer.

Black Angus newborn with mother laying inside barn.Violet has long legs and it took several attempts before she could figure out how to get those appendages under her in order to be able to stand up.

Once she figured out the legs, she stood up and started walking until she was steady enough to nurse.

Newborn Angus calf taking first steps with mother cow inside barn.Mother and baby are doing well and we moved them out of the barn into the nursery field with the rest of the mothers and babies.

Princess and Duke

Two cows, Princess and Blush were moved into the nursery field. Mike remarked that they both could calve any day and needed to be out in the green pasture where they could avoid the muddy side hill around the feeding mangers.

Out of the two cows, Princess had her baby first. Welcome to the world, Duke who weighed in at 72 lbs.

Mother and newborn black angus calf in pasture eating hay.

A Short Trip from the Main Herd

It was a short trailer ride from the main herd across the river for our herd sire. We moved him to this side of the river for two reasons, one to segregate him from the cows that are near calving and to breed the three cows that have already calved in the pasture next to the house.

Black Angus bull in barn eating hay in manger with three cows and three calves.We let him out of the trailer and he walked over to the barn and sunk his nose into the pile of sweet grass hay in the manger. Once he had his fill, he checked out his pen mates.

The three cows with their young calves seemed non-pulsedĀ  over the fact that the large bull has invaded their area and welcomed him once everyone was done eating.