An OWC Tour

A homemade sawhorse capable of holding 8 foot logsProducers of firewood for the Oregon Woodland Co-op made their way to member Lyal Purinton’s farm to see his innovative production techniques.

Lyal has built a specialty sawhorse that can hold several small 8 foot long logs in place at one time. The grooves are set so the chainsaw can slip between the top vee thereby holding the logs in place while cutting the logs into uniform 16 inch blocks. Continue reading

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A Couple Of Mud Drying Days

The sun made its appearance with a couple of warm, dry days and we were able to get the Big Red Beast that is loaded with dry, seasoned firewood out of the barn across the river and tucked safely into the bundling barn.

Truck filled with wood with loaded cribs tucked around itThe truck is nosed in tight to the hay stack and is within inches of the far wall so she is out of the way leaving us plenty of room to do the cattle business on the other side of the barn and store equipment. This is considered ‘reserve’ wood, our five cord to be used when the cold weather hits and we are scrambling to keep up with firewood orders.

With the truck, Mike also moved several 1/2 cord cribs of firewood and kindling into position around the truck where they are ready to be the most current supply of ready wood for bundling. Continue reading

So You Think You Can Wood 5

Part 5 in a series of stories about our farm, the firewood production project and our involvement with Oregon Woodland Coop.

The first story of the series looked at history, growing conditions and what kind of wood that is available with our farm/forest protocol. The second story got into the volume of wood, the manner of storage and how much space is needed for the process. Story three examined our steps of how to get from log to firewood. Story four showed the bundling process. Story 5, the order and delivery. Continue reading

A Slow Fill

The Big Red Beast is done with her regular jobs for the season. The hay has been harvested and hauled. Rock loaded and spread along roads and pathways. This is the time of year when the old farm truck gets tucked into the barn for a good long rest while fall and winter months take hold.

Dry firewood stacked, ready to be split and loaded into farm truckLast year we tried something different and used the empty bed of the Big Red Beast to store a supply of ready to bundle firewood. It gave us an extra five cord of wood holding power of dry, seasoned firewood in a space that would be taken up by the truck anyway.

I have been running into the same problem as loggers of trying to find dry weather to actually get the truck filled. I have to have several consecutive dry days in order to get the wood split and loaded into the truck. Continue reading

From One Landing To Another

A front loader tractor moving a logWith the logging project squashed for the winter, Mike has been busy transferring the bits and pieces of the left-over logs from the back landing to the front landing.

These logs are destined to be worked up for the firewood project. On a typical year when the rains have not yet gooed up the place, I would be out there cutting them into chunks destined for the splitter, but as it is they are not in a good spot for production. Continue reading

So You Think You Can Wood 4

Part 4 in a series of stories about our farm, the firewood production project and our involvement with Oregon Woodland Coop.

The first story of the series, looked at history, growing conditions and what kind of wood that is available with our farm/forest protocol. The second story got into the volume of wood, the manner of storage and how much space is needed for the process. Story three examined our steps of how to get from log to firewood. Story four, the bundling process.

Part 4- The Bundling Process

Splitter with stacks and crib of firewoodBy cutting dry wood, logs that have been aged through the winter, spring and some summer months, we are able to avoid a lot of the drying and curing process since nature has done most of that work already. We purchased the gas-powered splitter from OWC because members get a discount from regular retail. Using the Super Split, we are able to easily move the splitter from one area of cut wood chunks to another or into the barn where we bring the wood to it during wet weather. Continue reading