Seven Days Of Rain

With weather forecasts calling for rain for the next foreseeable future, at least seven days, it is supposed to rain.

The swamp drainage culvert under the county road is already running water to the river.  We have been making sure all eaves are clean and flowing smoothly, ditched around barns susceptible to puddling and rushing water running through. It is now time to lock the main herd out of the hay field/pasture area.

The gate entry points were closed at the back of the main field.  As you can see from the picture, puddles are already sitting where the animals tread back and forth out of the hay field.A man standing in a puddle and closed a wire gate.

The gates are located back by the spring, near the current log landing and down into the six acre field. We also drove steel posts  across the expanse between the barn and the fence that goes around the field so the cows would not have access around the barn where they like to converge during poor weather. They will have plenty of space to get cover along the hillside under the large fir trees.

Working on temporary electric fence.Barb wire was used as the bottom and New Zealand wire (white plastic tape with copper threads running through for conductivity visibility) was used for the top wire. The wires were attached to the steel posts by insulators and electrified by a solar powered pack attached to the side of the barn. This time of year, with all the darkness and cloud cover, the fence is not very hot with current although the animals do not test the fence since they are used to electric fences.

Keeping the cows out of the hay field/pasture allows for the grass to fill in where it had been dried out during the heat at the end of the summer and it keeps all those big footy prints from chewing up the tender growth. As the cows begin calving, the field will be used as the nursery field.

 

 

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If I Told You To Go Sit In A Corner

It was a windy, rainy day and I was walking down the driveway to go out to the mailbox when I noticed a clump of bulls in the bull pen.

Four bulls cuddled up under a tree in the corner of the pasture.All four of them were snuggled into one little corner under a large fir tree. This was on a slope and within inches of the electric fence that runs on the inside of the woven wire fence.

The biggest bull was literally cornered. He had no way to have enough room to stand up until the other three made way for him to move. The snugness didn’t seem to bother any of them and they were content to stay this way for a couple of hours until the rain let up before slowly untangling themselves from the pile of bull they had created.

Now if I would have told them to go sit in a corner, how successful do you think I would have been?

 

 

Soaking Rains

This last week has brought soaking rains to the farm, a lightening strike that flattened a condo in Coos Bay, a funnel cloud over the ocean at Tillamook and tornado warnings for Astoria. To say the least the weather has been dynamic and has gone a long way to calm the fire danger here at home and at the several large wildfires burning throughout the western states including the Columbia River Gorge.

The much needed moisture put a stop to our logging because it made the roads up the hill slick and gooey. Mike tried to move the bulldozer up the skid road, the tracks would dig down to dry earth and move a few feet, then have to dig again before moving forward. At the second bend and just before the steep stretch, the dozer could go no further and he had to back down the winding road moving slow inches at a time to stay on the path.

A large puddle pooled infront of log deck.In the landing, the area right in front of the log deck held more than a foot of rainwater. If there were anyway to get a self-loader truck in the swamped road to get to the pile, the truck would sink below the axles with the weight of the logs.

Mike brought in three truckloads of rock to fill in this puddle, smoothed the rock and compacted it with the dozer. It will still be several days before we will be able to get the log truck in for this load.

Powerful Storm Cell

Two days of the thermometer hovering around 100 degrees, made for some very tough work conditions out in the hay field.

Everyone had a bottle of water handy at all times. Many breaks were needed throughout the heat. The tractors needed times to cool down because the heat coming off the drive shaft made it impossible to hold one’s feet on the clutch and brakes. Even the dogs struggled to stay in the field and made many trips down to the river to catch a cooling swim, they kept the moisture on their coats instead of shaking off and would seek shade anytime a piece of equipment was turned off. Continue reading

Gully-Washers and Thunder Bumpers

The forecast called for rain and the morning looked like a front was definitely moving in. We decided it would be a good day to work in the barn putting the parts on the bale wagon that we had ordered last week.

A view from inside the barn as a hard spring rain shower begins to mud up dirt road.Looking out through the bars of the barn gate the rain had started to mud up the dirt road leading to the bridge.

About then a storm cell above us let loose with what looked like a fire-hose amount of water. The drops hitting the metal roof was so loud we could not hear each other talk or shout.

Puddles filled with water after a spring shower.Within minutes the dirt road was filled with puddles, the grass growing in the hay field was flattened and we had recorded over a half inch of rain in less than an hour.

This amount of rain will push back the start time for mowing the hay fields, it will take more than a week for the ground to dry out under the grass. The rain also temporarily stopped our logging operation because the road is too muddy to even get to the bulldozer or the landing, and the bulldozer would not be able to go up the skid roads with it being this wet and slippery.

Concentrating on the hay equipment in the meantime will keep us busy in the meantime.

Last Puddle In Driveway

I have to admit that my puddles may be bigger than most. I blame it on the heavy equipment like tractors and pickups with stock trailers that frequent my driveway. A lot of the responsibility however falls on the fact that we have slacked over the last couple of years with the amount of rock hauled and packed onto the surface. Just another one of those tasks that does not fall into the emergency category and gets forgotten during the summer and fall when it should be done. Continue reading

Did I Mention The Rain?

Weather forecasters look at things differently than many of us do, they begin their calendars on October 1st instead of January 1st. October 1st is considered the beginning of the winter season that supplies the area with the rain in the valley and snow pack in the Cascades. That in turn determines our predictability throughout the summer months to grow the verdant greens of crops, trees, and all manner of vegetation. Continue reading